Force11 Blogs


Guest Post – A Study of Commenting on PLOS Articles

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Wednesday, May 15, 2019 - 2:30am

Despite the near consensus about the popularity (or lack thereof) of commenting on academic articles, there is surprisingly little publicly available data relating to commenting rates. To address...


Storing Data In Oligopeptides

Source: DSHR's Blog Posted: Tuesday, May 14, 2019 - 8:00am

Bryan Cafferty et al have published a paper entitled Storage of Information Using Small Organic Molecules. There's a press release from Harvard's Wyss Institute at Storage Beyond the Cloud. Below the...


Data Communities: A New Model for Supporting STEM Data Sharing

Source: Scholarly Communication – The Idealis Posted: Tuesday, May 14, 2019 - 6:30am

There is a growing perception that science can progress more quickly, more innovatively, and more rigorously when researchers share data with each other. Policies and supports for data sharing within...


The death of the literature review and the rise of the dynamic knowledge map

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Tuesday, May 14, 2019 - 3:15am

Almost every academic article starts with a literature review. However, although these short research summaries can be beneficial, as discussed in previous posts on the LSE Impact Blog, they also...


Guest Post: Evaluating Open Access in a Consortial Context

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Tuesday, May 14, 2019 - 2:30am

Gwen Evans, Executive Director of the OhioLink consortium suggests that there is no standard Read and Publish or Publish and Read deal that will fit all consortia, and significant negotiation and...


What’s New Season 2 Wrap-up

Source: Dan Cohen's Blog Posted: Monday, May 13, 2019 - 12:25pm

With the end of the academic year at Northeastern University, the library wraps up our What’s New podcast, an interview series with researchers who help us understand, in plainspoken ways, some...


Speeding up the publication process at PLOS ONE

Source: Plos One Community Blog Posted: Monday, May 13, 2019 - 8:51am

0000-0002-6370-4254  At PLOS ONE we like to speed up the publication process wherever we can. We like science to be out in the open, and publication of peer-reviewed research to take place...


Crafting Linked Open Data to Enhance the Discoverability of Institutional Repositories on the Web

Source: Scholarly Communication – The Idealis Posted: Monday, May 13, 2019 - 7:30am

Institutional repositories are archives for collecting and disseminating digital copies of the intellectual output of institutions. Linked open data is to expose and connect pieces of data,...


Open and closed – What do reverse flips tell us about the scholarly publishing landscape?

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Monday, May 13, 2019 - 4:00am

The progress of Open Access (OA) is often measured by the proportion of journals that have transitioned to OA publication models. However, a number of journals have made the opposite choice and moved...


Book Review: Gender and Precarious Research Careers: A Comparative Analysis edited by Annalisa Murgia and Barbara Poggio

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Sunday, May 12, 2019 - 1:00am

In Gender and Precarious Research Careers: A Comparative Analysis, editors Annalisa Murgia and Barbara Poggio bring together contributors to offer an essential interrogation of the neoliberal...


Apple’s Vision of the Future (from 1987)

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Friday, May 10, 2019 - 2:30am

A look back at a glorious Apple promotional video from 1987, as the company predicted a rosy future while just on the edge of its darkest period. The post Apple’s Vision of the Future (from...


Immutability FTW!

Source: DSHR's Blog Posted: Thursday, May 9, 2019 - 8:00am

There's an apparently apocryphal story that when Willie Sutton, the notorious bank robber of the 1930s  to 1950s, was asked why he robbed banks, he answered:Because that's where the money is!...


Death of the author? AI generated books and the production of scientific knowledge

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Thursday, May 9, 2019 - 3:01am

Artificial Intelligence (AI) has been applied to an increasing number of creative tasks from the composition of music, to painting and more recently the creation of academic texts. Reflecting on this...


Building Your Career in Scholarly Communication: Tips, Tricks and Everything You Ever Wanted to Know!

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Thursday, May 9, 2019 - 2:30am

Charlie Rapple summarizes the panel discussion from SSP's first UK regional event, with highlights and tips relating to career breadth, the pros and cons of working in big vs small companies,...


If At First You Don’t Succeed … Make Another Response to Plan S?

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Wednesday, May 8, 2019 - 2:30am

cOAlition S rebuffed recommendations for continuing hybrid and supporting sister journals. Springer Nature tries again with concept of the "Transformative Publisher." Thoughts? The post If At First...


Demand Is Even Less Insatiable Than It Used To Be

Source: DSHR's Blog Posted: Tuesday, May 7, 2019 - 8:00am

In Demand Is Far From Insatiable I looked at Chris Mellor's overview of the miserable Q2 numbers from Seagate, Nearline disk drive demand dip dropkicks Seagate: How deep is the trough, how deep is...


Mapping the impact of UN Sustainable Development Goals on global research

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Tuesday, May 7, 2019 - 8:00am

The UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) represent one of the largest and most sustained influences on global research to date. However, charting the effect of these 17 goals on the global...


How to publish reusable enzymology data?

Source: Plos One Community Blog Posted: Tuesday, May 7, 2019 - 8:06am

In this blog post Carsten Kettner, from the Beilstein-Institut discusses the role STRENDA Guidelines and Database play in helping publish reusable enzymology data. Even though the idea of a holistic...


Identifying and Responding to Micro-aggressions at Work: An Interview with Dr. Joseph Williams

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Tuesday, May 7, 2019 - 2:30am

Dr Joseph Williams, an expert in multicultural and social justice training, is delivering a pre-conference workshop on micro-aggressions at the SSP Annual Meeting. Find out more in this interview!...


The University of California and Elsevier: An Interview with Jeff MacKie-Mason

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Monday, May 6, 2019 - 5:10am

Rick Anderson interviews Jeff MacKie-Mason about the University of California system's recent break with Elsevier. The post The University of California and Elsevier: An Interview with Jeff MacKie-...


The New “University Journals” in the Marketplace

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Monday, May 6, 2019 - 2:30am

For “University Publishing” to succeed by any measure, however, it is going to have to attract a lot of authors. The post The New “University Journals” in the Marketplace appeared first on The...


New Media New Knowledge – How the printing press led to a transformation of European thought

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Sunday, May 5, 2019 - 2:00am

Fundamental changes in information technologies have profound implications for labour markets, for the production and spread of knowledge, and for the evolution of politics and beliefs. But...


Running a ‘nearly carbon neutral conference’ – Lessons from the Feral Conference

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Friday, May 3, 2019 - 3:00am

Previous posts on the Impact Blog have argued that academic conferences are bad for the environment and can present a barrier to increased diversity and inclusion within the research community....


Remembering Sydney Brenner

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Friday, May 3, 2019 - 2:30am

Remembering one of the founding fathers of molecular biology and modern genetics, Sydney Brenner. The post Remembering Sydney Brenner appeared first on The Scholarly Kitchen.


Lets Put Our Money Where Our Ethics Are

Source: DSHR's Blog Posted: Thursday, May 2, 2019 - 8:00am

I found a video of Jefferson Bailey's talk at the Ethics of Archiving the Web conference from a year ago. It was entitled Lets Put Our Money Where Our Ethics Are. The talk is the first 18.5 minutes...