Force11 Blogs


Why Restrictions on Reuse Are Sometimes Important

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Monday, October 1, 2012 - 2:30am

"How Open Is It?" offers a useful set of parameters for defining "open," but some fundamental questions remain, including the commercial and social consequences of free distribution. Continue reading...


I did a talk at TED about drug companies and hidden data.

Source: Bad Science Posted: Friday, September 28, 2012 - 3:03am

I did a talk at TED about drug companies hiding the results of clinical trials. This is a huge, ongoing problem, and it results in patients suffering and dying unnecessarily. So I’m really...


What’s the added value of collaborating with academics?

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Friday, September 28, 2012 - 3:00am

Too many academics remain rooted in a mentality that fears engaging with practitioners means reducing the credibility of their work. Rachel Hayman calls for greater collaboration...


Big-science goes local: democratization of sequencing demonstrated by the parrot genome

Source: GigaBlog Posted: Friday, September 28, 2012 - 2:24am

A Grassroots Funding effort in Puerto Rico enables genome sequencing of the critically endangered Puerto Rican parrot The rationale and scope for GigaScience has been to cover and provide a home...


Responsive Web Design Comes to Scholarly Publishing

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Friday, September 28, 2012 - 2:30am

JSTOR recently announced that it has reconfigured its user interface using responsive design techniques. While nascent in STM and scholarly publishing, the user interface design world has been abuzz...


A selection of influential PLOS ONE papers on tropical medicine and malaria

Source: Plos One Community Blog Posted: Thursday, September 27, 2012 - 1:02pm

For the XVIII International Congress for Tropical Medicine and Malaria Conference in Rio de Janeiro, PLOS ONE is highlighting eight recent articles.  Since January 2011, PLOS ONE has published almost...


Notes from Desiging Storage Architectures workshop

Source: DSHR's Blog Posted: Thursday, September 27, 2012 - 9:00am

Below the fold are some notes from this year's Library of Congress Designing Storage Architectures meeting.There was wide agreement among the industry attendees that in the next 5 years or so Kryder...


Why read about writing?

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Thursday, September 27, 2012 - 3:00am

Academics tend to focus on how best to get their outputs read, rather than on the writing process itself. Pat Thomson argues writing itself deserves attention. If academics embrace...


Retractions Retraction — Did We “Overinterpret” or Did PLoS Editors “Overwrite”?

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Thursday, September 27, 2012 - 2:30am

A flash mob of concern causes PLoS to reconsider a new policy on retractions. Continue reading »


Women’s Health and Fitness Series Part V: Pregnancy

Source: Plos One Community Blog Posted: Wednesday, September 26, 2012 - 1:19pm

In this last post of the Women’s Health and Fitness Series, we delve into the mother of all topics: pregnancy. As one of the few health topics that truly only affects women, pregnancy is highly...


Making academic knowledge useful to policy : why “supply” solutions are not the whole story

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Wednesday, September 26, 2012 - 3:00am

When looking at how academic knowledge informs policy there is a heavy emphasis on the need for academics to improve their communication and dissemination of outputs to fit better...


The Internet Association, Jar Jar Binks, Regulatory Capture, and the Drift Toward Self-Interest

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Wednesday, September 26, 2012 - 2:30am

Trade groups often start with their audience in mind, but over time devolve into self-centered agendas. Will the new Internet Association fall into this time-tested trap? Continue reading »


Treading Water on Open Access

Source: Dan Cohen's Blog Posted: Tuesday, September 25, 2012 - 10:25am

A statement from the governing council of the American Historical Association, September 2012: The American Historical Association voices concerns about recent developments in the debates over “open...


The launch of ImpactStory: using altmetrics to tell data-driven stories

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Tuesday, September 25, 2012 - 3:00am

By providing real-time information, altmetrics are shifting how research impact is understood. Jason Priem and Heather Piwowar outline the launch of ImpactStory, a new webapp aiming...


Do Hamsters Pirate Books?

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Tuesday, September 25, 2012 - 2:30am

While the effect of piracy on some book sales is still debatable, college textbooks lose sales when online file-sharing becomes prevalent. A recent examination of the situation in a market outside...


Here’s the foreword to my new book.

Source: Bad Science Posted: Tuesday, September 25, 2012 - 12:30am

My new book Bad Pharma is out today. I’ll post more about that this afternoon, in particular on what I hope you might do, to change some of the very serious problems described. But first, with...


Woman’s Health and Fitness Series IV: Ovarian Cancer

Source: Plos One Community Blog Posted: Monday, September 24, 2012 - 3:56pm

In the last few weeks, we have discussed a range of topics that influence woman’s health and fitness, including obesity, cardiovascular disease and anorexia.  Today, in honor of Ovarian Cancer...


How can universities support local disadvantaged communities?

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Monday, September 24, 2012 - 3:00am

Public engagement remains one of the most tangible ways universities can demonstrate their impact. Fred Robinson finds that in a time of stretched resources, universities can play a...


Wikipedia’s Writing — Tests Show It’s Too Sophisticated for Its Audience

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Monday, September 24, 2012 - 2:30am

Wikipedia aims to be an encyclopedia for everyone, but its core version is too difficult for most readers, and even its Simple English offshoot falls short of its readability goals. Continue reading...


Procrastinate until your heart’s content: we make better decisions when we take our time

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Sunday, September 23, 2012 - 3:00am

In Wait: The Art of Procrastination, Frank Partnoy argues that decisions of all kinds, whether ‘snap’ or long-term, benefit from being made at the last possible moment. The art of...


Women’s Health and Fitness Series Part III: Anorexia

Source: Plos One Community Blog Posted: Friday, September 21, 2012 - 3:01pm

As National Women’s Health and Fitness Day approaches on September 26th, there are only a few more topics left in PLOS ONE’s first blog series. Two recently published papers explore the various...


Talk at "Designing Storage Architectures"

Source: DSHR's Blog Posted: Friday, September 21, 2012 - 9:00am

I gave a talk at the Library of Congress' Designing Storage Architecture workshop entitled The Truth Is Out There: Long-Term Economics in the Cloud. Below the fold is an edited text with links to the...


Digital scholarship, tenure & barometers

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Friday, September 21, 2012 - 3:00am

Martin Weller highlights the essential responsibility on the side of the university in institutionalising recognition and reward for academics’ digital activities. Furthermore...


Curiosity About the Breathtaking “Mars Curiosity Descent” Video?

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Friday, September 21, 2012 - 2:30am

An impressive video of the Mars Curiosity Rover's landing -- from the Rover's perspective -- has been circulating. Now, a "how it was made" video reveals some of what it took to make it. Continue...


Holy crap I just touched my new book!

Source: Bad Science Posted: Thursday, September 20, 2012 - 11:56am

I just touched my new book, it is a thing of beauty and power. My advice is to buy one right now, before they all get seized and pulped. In paperback here: amzn.to/N1QJTD And Kindle here: amzn.to/...