Force11 Blogs


A new paradigm of scholarly communications is emerging: A report from the Future of Impact conference

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Wednesday, December 12, 2012 - 3:00am

Policymakers and academics agree that the economic or public impact of research can’t be demonstrated through just citations and bibliometrics yet open access publishing, altmetrics and online...


Editorial Spoofing in the Age of Electronic Peer-Review

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Wednesday, December 12, 2012 - 1:30am

In a story of the modern age of fraud, spoofers find their way into peer-review rosters, reviewing their own papers or those of their friends/competitors. Continue reading »


New Players, New Priorities — Part 3: It’s Never About the Money; It’s Always About the Money

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Wednesday, December 12, 2012 - 1:30am

Funders and governments are exerting their influence in scientific publishing through monetary and financial threats, and are willing to slow science in order to accomplish OA goals. Continue reading...


Gaming Google Scholar Citations, Made Simple and Easy

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Wednesday, December 12, 2012 - 1:30am

A new paper demonstrates how easy it is to game Google Scholar Citations, and how the system is resilient against correction. Continue reading »


OA and the UK Humanities & Social Sciences: Wrong risks and missed opportunities

Source: Science in the Open Posted: Wednesday, December 12, 2012 - 12:43am

Someone once said to me that the best way to get researchers to be serious about the issue of modernising scholarly communications was to let the scholarly monograph business go to the wall as an...


A rockin’ good time at AGU

Source: Plos One Community Blog Posted: Tuesday, December 11, 2012 - 3:00pm

Last week the American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting was held just down the road from our San Francisco office, and PLOS staff could not pass up the opportunity to make an appearance. If you...


Talk at Fall 2012 CNI

Source: DSHR's Blog Posted: Tuesday, December 11, 2012 - 9:00am

I gave a talk at CNI's Fall 2012 Membership Meeting entitled The Truth Is Out There: Preservation and the Cloud. It was an updated and shortened version of a seminar I had given in mid-November at UC...


Proving dissemination is only one half of your impact story: Twitter provides proof of real-time engagement with the public

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Tuesday, December 11, 2012 - 3:00am

Getting a research story into the broadcast media can be an important opportunity to show impact. Alistair Brown explains how to use Twitter to monitor real time responses to a radio story, in order...


New Players, New Priorities — Part 2: The Problematic Role of Funders

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Tuesday, December 11, 2012 - 1:30am

Funders -- corporate, governmental, and philanthropic -- have different priorities, yet they are now reaching into scientific publishing, wearing OA as a glove that fits. This post explores the...


Scientists Propose Central Database for Disclosing Conflicts of Interest

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Tuesday, December 11, 2012 - 1:30am

Creating a centralized database for disclosing conflicts of interest (COI) is an easy sell. Deciding who is responsible and accountable for its funding and support is a much harder problem. Continue...


Sharing makes Glacier economics even better

Source: DSHR's Blog Posted: Monday, December 10, 2012 - 11:00am

A more detailed analysis of the economics of Glacier sharing the same infrastructure as S3 than I posted here makes the picture look even better from Amazon's point of view. The point I missed is...


Why does the NIH have to tell us how to conduct research?

Source: NIF Blog FORCE11 Posted: Monday, December 10, 2012 - 11:24am

by Anita Bandrowski Dr. Landis, and the rest of the ‘who-is-who-in-science’ have recently published a paper (PMID:23060188) in Nature about the reporting practices in biological sciences...


Calling open access academic book publishers: How authors and publishers could make a modest profit

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Monday, December 10, 2012 - 3:00am

Reputation, professional copyediting and promotion; academics gain a lot from working with a professional publisher but there’s no need to go it alone to go open access. Martin Weller writes that...


Stretching “Impact” By Many “Factors” — Signs of Thrall and Uncertainty?

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Monday, December 10, 2012 - 1:30am

As new metrics are explored, not everything equates to "impact." Getting our terms right will help us get our thinking straight. Continue reading »


New Players, New Priorities — Part 1: Governments and Politics Enter Scientific Publishing

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Monday, December 10, 2012 - 1:30am

In this first part of a three-part series, the intrusion of governments into scientific publishing is contemplated -- its causes, current state, and possible effects. Continue reading »


Bad habits in science

Source: Science to Grok Posted: Sunday, December 9, 2012 - 4:31pm

Of course grokking science needs time, so we could partially sympathize with the Slow Science Manifesto that state:"We do need time to think. We do need time to digest. We do need time to mis­...


Pushing the limits of multidisciplinaity

Source: Science to Grok Posted: Sunday, December 9, 2012 - 4:31pm

The lack of communication in multidisciplinary approaches could lead to big mistakes.Today's science is mainly about interdisciplinarity, in particular when one have to face complex systems. The...


Nostalgia

Source: DSHR's Blog Posted: Friday, December 7, 2012 - 8:28pm

Google has a nice post with a short video commemorating today's 50th birthday of the Ferranti Atlas, the UK's first "supercomputer". Although it wasn't the first computer I programmed, Cambridge...


3D Virtual Cell Conference, yes you can attend virtually

Source: NIF Blog FORCE11 Posted: Friday, December 7, 2012 - 2:18pm

The organizers of the 3D Virtual Cell Conference cordially invite interested parties to attend the 3DVC Conference, held on December 13th – 14th, 2012 in San Diego. The conference will have...


Five minutes with Andrew Herbert: “The social scientists we could do business with were those who grounded their ideas through field studies, cultural probes and social data”.

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Friday, December 7, 2012 - 3:00am

Part of PPG’s Impact of Social Sciences project focuses on how academic research in the social sciences influences decision-makers in business, government and civil society. Rebecca Mann talked to...


A Call for Participation — A Survey on Book Discovery

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Friday, December 7, 2012 - 1:30am

A call to participate in a survey on how books are discovered and ultimately purchased. The survey is being conducted in cooperation with O'Reilly Media. Continue reading »


Updating "More on Glacier Pricing"

Source: DSHR's Blog Posted: Thursday, December 6, 2012 - 9:00am

In September I posted More on Glacier Pricing including a comparison with our baseline local storage model. Last week I posted Updating "Cloud vs. Local Storage Costs which among other things updated...


Universities should sink their resources into publishing partnerships with scholarly societies

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Thursday, December 6, 2012 - 3:00am

Christopher Land writes that a hybrid partnership between the university press and scholarly society would put publishing back under academic control and would produce a more open, and impactful,...


Theory of the E-book

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Thursday, December 6, 2012 - 1:30am

There is an unstated theory of the e-book, which assumes that a book consists only of its text and can be manipulated without regard to the nature and circumstances of its creation. This is only one...


Generous Interfaces for Scholarly Sites

Source: Dan Cohen's Blog Posted: Wednesday, December 5, 2012 - 7:56pm

From time to time administrators ask me what I think the home page of a university website should look like. I tell them it should look like the music site The Sixty One, which simply puts a giant...