Force11 Blogs


My talking head – on open access & social media

Source: Think Links Posted: Monday, October 22, 2012 - 10:58am

For International Open Access Week the VU University Amsterdam  is working with other Dutch universities to provide information to academics on open access. Here’s a video they took of me...


REF Advice Note 1: Understanding Hefce’s definition of Impact

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Monday, October 22, 2012 - 3:00am

English universities have begun spending millions of pounds and thousands of staff hours on preparing for the 2014 Research Excellence Framework. Some of these resources will be devoted to the 5,000...


Something’s Rotten in Bethesda — The Troubling Tale of PubMed Central, PubMed, and eLife

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Monday, October 22, 2012 - 2:30am

Last week, PubMed Central became the primary and sole publisher of eLife content, putting its competition with publishers, its manipulation of PubMed indexing criteria, its competition with...


The Open PHACTS project – 1.5 years in

Source: Think Links Posted: Saturday, October 20, 2012 - 6:35am

For the last 1.5 years, I’ve been working on the Open PHACTS project – a public private partnership for pharmacology  data integration. Below is a good video from Lee Harland the CTO...


Spiders, Birds, and Snakes, Oh my!

Source: Plos One Community Blog Posted: Friday, October 19, 2012 - 3:31pm

To continue our spooktacular posts this October, we bring you a study which may have some arachnophobes rethinking their next vacation destination. The island of Guam is home to one of the densest...


Evidence alone is not enough: policymakers must be able to access relevant evidence if their policy is to work

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Friday, October 19, 2012 - 3:00am

It is not enough to look for evidence of a previous policy success. Jeremy Hardie and Nancy Cartwright argue that exactly what evidence is needed, and of what, is the key question that needs to be...


Dark Social — A New Concept in Analytics That Explains Much of What We (Don’t) See

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Friday, October 19, 2012 - 2:30am

The dark matter of social sharing may be visible now, thanks to some smart theory, not more data. Continue reading »


Great article in Trials, on why regulators should stop withholding trial info from doctors and patients

Source: Bad Science Posted: Thursday, October 18, 2012 - 11:15am

One thing in Bad Pharma has shocked readers more than anything else: the way that vitally important information about trials is withheld from doctors and patients, not just by drug companies, but...


Using Google to gauge impact: the Nobel Prize in Economics

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Thursday, October 18, 2012 - 3:00am

Winning a Nobel Prize really is the ultimate demonstration of academic impact, but why would the public seem more interested in one of two joint winners? Rebecca Mann traces the public’s desire for...


Does All Science Need to be Preserved? Do We Need to Save Every Last Data Point?

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Thursday, October 18, 2012 - 2:30am

The era of Big Data raises many questions about why and how data should or can be preserved, who should lead the effort, and what the cost-benefit equation currently is. Continue reading »


Factoring in fear: what scares us most?

Source: Plos One Community Blog Posted: Wednesday, October 17, 2012 - 4:06pm

Maybe you’ve seen a ghost, or been told the house in this picture is haunted, or watched enough scary movies to associate houses like this with spooks. But which of these three is the most likely to...


First methylated nematode genome and other new datasets in GigaDB

Source: GigaBlog Posted: Wednesday, October 17, 2012 - 12:10pm

The worm that turned (epigenetics) GigaDB, GigaScience’s associated database, has had a number of new datasets just added, many for data types previously not hosted. Today marks the publication of...


There’s something fishy about citations: We need a method of assessing the support of research if we want to change the ‘publish or perish’ culture

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Wednesday, October 17, 2012 - 3:00am

Current citation biases give us only the narrowest slice of scientific support. Bradley Voytek writes that while BrainSCANr may have flaws, it gives the reader a quick indication of how well-...


Recuse, Refuse, or Excuse — The Conflicts of Interest at the Heart of Funder-Backed Journals

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Wednesday, October 17, 2012 - 2:30am

Funder-sponsored journals raise important conflict of interest questions, and may be fundamentally untenable in an industry that requires independent third-party evaluation of research reports....


The Digital Public Library of America: Coming Together

Source: Dan Cohen's Blog Posted: Tuesday, October 16, 2012 - 9:03am

I’m just back from the Digital Public Library of America meeting in Chicago, and like many others I found the experience inspirational. Just two years ago a small group convened at the...


Tweeting out loud: ethics, knowledge and social media in academe

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Tuesday, October 16, 2012 - 3:00am

Traditional and digital methods of dissemination clashed recently when a storm over live-tweeting academic conferences blew up in the US. Melonie Fullick looks at the accusation that academics can...


PDA and the University Press — Final Study Now Available

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Tuesday, October 16, 2012 - 2:30am

Joe Esposito, with his colleagues Kizer Walker and Terry Ehling, has been working on an analysis of patron-driven acquisitions (PDA) for the past year. Joe has been posting early drafts of sections...


Authors Aren’t Scientists, Scientists Are Authors — Why Catering to a Role Can Inhibit Robust Publishing

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Tuesday, October 16, 2012 - 2:30am

"Author-service" journals sound like a straightforward proposition, but when you contemplate how authorship is a minority activity by a minority of practicing scientists and science practitioners, it...


Kuali Days 2012

Source: McDonald Online Posted: Monday, October 15, 2012 - 8:39am

This week I am posting and tweeting from Kauli Days 2012 in Austin, TX. We have over 800 attendees this year from 40 different u.s. states and 8 countries internationally. See below for a picture of...


Help us to understand more about how research in your discipline has impact in society!

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Monday, October 15, 2012 - 3:00am

Calling all university social scientists… Help us to understand more about how research in your discipline has impacts in society. Fill out our short survey here As part of the Impact of Social...


Mapping the Flow of Rejected Manuscripts

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Monday, October 15, 2012 - 2:30am

A study of the flow of manuscript submissions reveals a highly structured and efficient network of scientific journals where peer-review plays a critical role in the improvement and slotting of...


Cleaning up the "Formats through tIme" mess

Source: DSHR's Blog Posted: Saturday, October 13, 2012 - 9:00am

As I said in this comment on my post Formats through time, time pressure meant that I made enough of a mess of it to need a whole new post to clean up. Below the fold is my attempt to remedy the...


I did this talk at TEDglobal last year. It’s quite… fast.

Source: Bad Science Posted: Saturday, October 13, 2012 - 7:34am

I did this talk at TEDglobal last year. It’s just hit a million views, and I realised I’ve never posted it online here. Hope you like it! www.ted.com/talks/...


DPLA MidWest Oct 11-12, 2012

Source: McDonald Online Posted: Friday, October 12, 2012 - 9:10am

Watch today's DPLA plenary session online now http://dp.la/get-involved/events/dplamidwest/livestream/ Working with many friends to see how DPLA can achieve some very ambitious goals!


DPLA Visual Notetakers

Source: McDonald Online Posted: Friday, October 12, 2012 - 9:11am

These guys are like watching live edward tufte or something!