Force11 Blogs


CC-Huh? Fundamental Confusions About the Role of Copyright and the Reuse of Data

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Tuesday, October 30, 2012 - 2:30am

A fundamental confusion between articles and data leads to a call for more CC licenses and less copyright. But why are data being closed down while articles are being opened up? Is there a...


eLife Articulates Its Media Policy, and Risks Some of Its Editorial Power

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Tuesday, October 30, 2012 - 2:30am

eLife clarifies its media policies, adopting the mask of an enlightened approach that actually makes it harder for everyone to generate much attention. Continue reading »


Halloween Highlights: Carnivorous Plants

Source: Plos One Community Blog Posted: Monday, October 29, 2012 - 1:28pm

Plants may not generally be associated with the spooky sentiments of Halloween, but put the right Hitchcock soundtrack with the video below and it could have come straight out of a Hollywood horror...


REF Advice Notes 3: What will Hefce count as ‘under-pinning’ research?

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Monday, October 29, 2012 - 4:06am

Many possible Impact Cases are likely to raise issues about whether they are sufficiently grounded on what the REF audit Panels can recognize as ‘2* research’. The Funding Council’s overly...


PubMed Central or OA Central — More Strange Behaviors at PMC and NLM Paint a Portrait of Biases and Poor Process

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Monday, October 29, 2012 - 2:30am

More information emerges about PubMed Central, its processes, its relationship with eLife, and its role as a technology provider. Overall, it looks like certain OA friends get special treatment, and...


Worth a Thousand Words

Source: Plos One Community Blog Posted: Friday, October 26, 2012 - 1:58pm

How many arrows are depicted in the photo above? How many can you find? One? Five? The answer is 118. In research published last week, researchers digitally compiled 118 different lithic points from...


Bringing research to a wider audience, and having an impact on the young, is easier when there is a meeting of the minds

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Friday, October 26, 2012 - 3:00am

Sparking the imagination of teenagers is never easy, so Anne Haour was initially stumped when she was faced with writing plans for ‘youth impact’ into her research bid. Here she writes how seemingly...


“Owa, mein Arsch” — When Water’s State Is More Set Than It Appears

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Friday, October 26, 2012 - 2:30am

"Look before you leap" may only be the beginning! Continue reading »


The hidden map of science: Pre-publication history of articles tells us that rejection leads to higher citations

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Thursday, October 25, 2012 - 3:00am

No-one wants to have their paper rejected by a top journal, but is there a silver lining to an initial disappointment? Vincent Calcagno finds that papers that are resubmitted to a second or third...


Book Review: Nate Silver’s “The Signal and the Noise: Why So Many Predictions Fail — But Some Don’t”

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Thursday, October 25, 2012 - 2:30am

Nate Silver's new book tackles many topics -- Big Data, the problem with scientific statistics, chess, baseball, gambling -- with style and substance. There's a lot of signal here. Continue reading...


Could sleepless nights of terror be good for you?

Source: Plos One Community Blog Posted: Wednesday, October 24, 2012 - 2:50pm

Lying awake and listening for demonic footsteps after Paranormal Activity 4 may turn out to be more helpful to your mental health than trying to fall asleep. A study published earlier this month in...


REF Advice Note 2: Identifying ‘possibles’ for your Impact Case Study

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Wednesday, October 24, 2012 - 3:00am

In the second of our free Advice Note series on how to write Impact Case Studies for the REF, Patrick Dunleavy explains how to sift out achievements that are ‘possible’ Cases and to begin developing...


Competition, Value, and Sustainability — Why This Can’t Go On

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Wednesday, October 24, 2012 - 2:30am

Value-based pricing of unique journal products may make sense from a revenue perspective, but not from a sustainability perspective. What are the options? Continue reading »


Peak Disk?

Source: DSHR's Blog Posted: Tuesday, October 23, 2012 - 9:00am

Thomas Coughlin has a blog post up at Forbes entitled "Have Hard Disk Drives Peaked?". It continues the optimism I poked fun at in Dr Pangloss' Notes From Dinner, concluding:Have hard disk drives...


Questions in Parliament, and a briefing note on missing trials: updated.

Source: Bad Science Posted: Tuesday, October 23, 2012 - 3:30am

This morning at 11:30, Dr Sarah Wollaston MP will ask questions in parliament about the ongoing scandal of missing trial data. This is widely recognised as a problem by academics and doctors, but...


Academic writing in old age: How retired academics can make considerable contributions to their institutions

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Tuesday, October 23, 2012 - 3:00am

James Hartley outlines two studies on academic writing in retirement and argues that many retired academics can contribute a good deal to research and practice. There have been two recent studies of...


Reclaiming the Lost Publishing Mojo

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Tuesday, October 23, 2012 - 2:30am

Publishers have lost ground in the public debate of the role of publishing in scholarly communications. A new strategy is needed, one that emphasizes preemption, cooptation, and innovation. Continue...


My talking head – on open access & social media

Source: Think Links Posted: Monday, October 22, 2012 - 10:58am

For International Open Access Week the VU University Amsterdam  is working with other Dutch universities to provide information to academics on open access. Here’s a video they took of me...


REF Advice Note 1: Understanding Hefce’s definition of Impact

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Monday, October 22, 2012 - 3:00am

English universities have begun spending millions of pounds and thousands of staff hours on preparing for the 2014 Research Excellence Framework. Some of these resources will be devoted to the 5,000...


Something’s Rotten in Bethesda — The Troubling Tale of PubMed Central, PubMed, and eLife

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Monday, October 22, 2012 - 2:30am

Last week, PubMed Central became the primary and sole publisher of eLife content, putting its competition with publishers, its manipulation of PubMed indexing criteria, its competition with...


The Open PHACTS project – 1.5 years in

Source: Think Links Posted: Saturday, October 20, 2012 - 6:35am

For the last 1.5 years, I’ve been working on the Open PHACTS project – a public private partnership for pharmacology  data integration. Below is a good video from Lee Harland the CTO...


Spiders, Birds, and Snakes, Oh my!

Source: Plos One Community Blog Posted: Friday, October 19, 2012 - 3:31pm

To continue our spooktacular posts this October, we bring you a study which may have some arachnophobes rethinking their next vacation destination. The island of Guam is home to one of the densest...


Evidence alone is not enough: policymakers must be able to access relevant evidence if their policy is to work

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Friday, October 19, 2012 - 3:00am

It is not enough to look for evidence of a previous policy success. Jeremy Hardie and Nancy Cartwright argue that exactly what evidence is needed, and of what, is the key question that needs to be...


Dark Social — A New Concept in Analytics That Explains Much of What We (Don’t) See

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Friday, October 19, 2012 - 2:30am

The dark matter of social sharing may be visible now, thanks to some smart theory, not more data. Continue reading »


Great article in Trials, on why regulators should stop withholding trial info from doctors and patients

Source: Bad Science Posted: Thursday, October 18, 2012 - 11:15am

One thing in Bad Pharma has shocked readers more than anything else: the way that vitally important information about trials is withheld from doctors and patients, not just by drug companies, but...