Force11 Blogs


Quantifying OA Complexity

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Monday, October 8, 2012 - 2:30am

A recent attempt by SPARC and others to assess "How Open Is It?" shows how complex OA publishing is, but also fails to accurately represent the potential complexities in many areas. Continue reading...


HBase RDF Loading – Do Coprocessors Help?

Source: Think Links Posted: Sunday, October 7, 2012 - 3:34pm

If you read this blog a bit, you’ll know I’m a fairly big fan of RDF as a data format. It’s really great for easily mashing different data sources together. The common syntax gets...


Halloween Highlights: Spooktacular Science in PLOS ONE

Source: Plos One Community Blog Posted: Friday, October 5, 2012 - 11:32am

October is here, which means the holiday season is almost upon us – starting, of course, with Halloween. PLOS ONE doesn’t publish much in the way of goblins, ghouls, or ghosts, but we realized that...


Topics revamp

Source: Research Gate Posted: Friday, October 5, 2012 - 6:27am

When we first built Topics a little over a year ago, we envisaged a place where researchers could connect, collaborate, discuss, and ultimately find solutions together. Topics has come a long way...


Topics revamp

Source: Research Gate Posted: Friday, October 5, 2012 - 6:27am

When we first built Topics a little over a year ago, we envisaged a place where researchers could connect, collaborate, discuss, and ultimately find solutions together. Topics has come a long way...


Topics revamp

Source: Research Gate Posted: Friday, October 5, 2012 - 6:27am

When we first built Topics a little over a year ago, we envisaged a place where researchers could connect, collaborate, discuss, and ultimately find solutions together. Topics has come a long way...


Five Minutes with Bernardo Huberman : “There are real opportunities for social scientists to turn their tools into something applicable to the real world”

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Friday, October 5, 2012 - 3:00am

Continuing a series of interviews from PPG’s Impact of Social Sciences project, Rebecca Mann spoke with Bernardo Huberman, who is Director of the Social Computing Research Group at HP Labs and...


I Wish I’d Had This Teacher — The Ping Pong Ball Explosion

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Friday, October 5, 2012 - 2:30am

And the sky rains ping pong balls, as this simple experiment provides both audible and visible entertainment. Continue reading »


The Journal of Digital Humanities Hits Full Stride

Source: Dan Cohen's Blog Posted: Thursday, October 4, 2012 - 9:59am

If you haven’t checked out the Journal of Digital Humanities yet, now’s the time to do so. My colleagues Joan Fragaszy Troyano, Jeri Wieringa, and Sasha Hoffman, along with our new...


Writing for Wikipedia has forced me into good scholarly habits and accessible writing

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Thursday, October 4, 2012 - 3:00am

Where Wikipedia has poor-quality articles, we should regard it as a great opportunity, argues Martin Poulter. Researchers and educators, especially in social science, should get involved in improving...


Does Open Access Tackle, Perpetuate, or Exacerbate the Matthew Effect?

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Thursday, October 4, 2012 - 2:30am

While some hope that OA will create a more accessible literature, new data about NSF funding and some logical extrapolations suggest it may actually exacerbate the Matthew Effect, choking off...


Manta ray preferences revealed

Source: Plos One Community Blog Posted: Wednesday, October 3, 2012 - 4:16pm

Image credit: Fabrice Jaine, PLOS ONE (2012) If the thought of a calm moonlit night out on a tropical island makes you want to be at the beach, you may have something in common with the reef manta...


Should text books be open and free?

Source: NIF Blog FORCE11 Posted: Wednesday, October 3, 2012 - 10:34am

by Anita Bandrowski We at NIF have recently discovered that Gov Brown (California) just signed into law a program that will create 50 lower division text books and a new library that will house them...


Universities and social media: Academics need to be bold in our use of social media and not outsource digital dissemination to widget gurus

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Wednesday, October 3, 2012 - 3:00am

Universities are unique institutions that need social media policies that fit their goals of knowledge creation and dissemination. Mark Smithers writes that this isn’t a task that should be...


Using the Scholarly Kitchen for Research

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Wednesday, October 3, 2012 - 2:30am

The Scholarly Kitchen can be a useful research tool for its contributors, as it enables the community to participate in certain kinds of questions. But group blogs don't work for everyone. Continue...


The New Wave of Gold OA Journals

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Wednesday, October 3, 2012 - 2:30am

The flood of OA journals and publishers continues worldwide, but the number of articles is still small in any field. Continue reading »


Research Data Alliance Planning Mtg

Source: McDonald Online Posted: Tuesday, October 2, 2012 - 6:22am

Hi All, This week (10.1.12-10.3.12) I am at an exciting meeting that is bringing together many of the big data projects throughout the world to a meeting in Arlington, VA in hopes of building a new...


There’s a disconnect between “scholarly value” and how we reach audiences who need research

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Tuesday, October 2, 2012 - 3:00am

Fed up of hearing that ‘outreach work is a stupid idea and a huge career mistake’, Li-Shih Huang argues that impact assessment must be not so narrow-minded and elitist. She writes that...


The Financial Burdens of the CC-BY License for Scholarly Literature

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Tuesday, October 2, 2012 - 2:30am

By allowing free commercial use of OA articles, current CC licenses may shift costs to researchers, presage an unsustainable information economy, and ultimately work against their stated goals. A...


Storage Will Be A Lot Less Free Than It Used To Be

Source: DSHR's Blog Posted: Monday, October 1, 2012 - 9:00am

I presented our paper The Economics of Long-Term Digital Storage (PDF) at UNESCO's "Memory of the World in the Digital Age" Conference in Vancouver, BC. It pulls together the modeling work we did up...


Will the REF disadvantage interdisciplinary research? The inadvertent effects of journal rankings

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Monday, October 1, 2012 - 3:00am

A failure to engage in interdisciplinary work risks creating intellectual inbreeding and could push research away from socially complex issues. Ismael Rafols asks why there is a bias against...


Why Restrictions on Reuse Are Sometimes Important

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Monday, October 1, 2012 - 2:30am

"How Open Is It?" offers a useful set of parameters for defining "open," but some fundamental questions remain, including the commercial and social consequences of free distribution. Continue reading...


I did a talk at TED about drug companies and hidden data.

Source: Bad Science Posted: Friday, September 28, 2012 - 3:03am

I did a talk at TED about drug companies hiding the results of clinical trials. This is a huge, ongoing problem, and it results in patients suffering and dying unnecessarily. So I’m really...


What’s the added value of collaborating with academics?

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Friday, September 28, 2012 - 3:00am

Too many academics remain rooted in a mentality that fears engaging with practitioners means reducing the credibility of their work. Rachel Hayman calls for greater collaboration...


Big-science goes local: democratization of sequencing demonstrated by the parrot genome

Source: GigaBlog Posted: Friday, September 28, 2012 - 2:24am

A Grassroots Funding effort in Puerto Rico enables genome sequencing of the critically endangered Puerto Rican parrot The rationale and scope for GigaScience has been to cover and provide a home...