Force11 Blogs


Open Access 2.0: Access to Scholarly Publications Moves to a New Phase

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Wednesday, February 20, 2013 - 1:30am

A reprint of an essay from 2008, which attempts to describe the evolution of open access publishing, Written before the astounding success of PLoS ONE, it outlines the link between open access...


A floral ‘map’ to nectar discourages bumblebee robbers

Source: Plos One Community Blog Posted: Tuesday, February 19, 2013 - 3:19pm

In the business of survival, the bright colors of blooming flowers mark a serious transaction. Their nectar, color and fragrances are all designed to attract pollinators to come hither and transfer...


Thoughts from FAST 2013

Source: DSHR's Blog Posted: Tuesday, February 19, 2013 - 9:00am

I attended Usenix's 2013 FAST conference. I was so interested in Kai Li's keynote entitled Disruptive Innovation: Data Domain Experience that I'll devote a separate post to it. Below the fold are...


Making an impact: communicating your research to a ‘stand up radio’ audience

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Tuesday, February 19, 2013 - 3:02am

Steven Fielding finds it bizarre that academics spend so much time producing knowledge, which they then share only with a tiny number of people. Radio documentaries are a great way for academics to...


It’s FASTR — Is It Bettr?

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Tuesday, February 19, 2013 - 1:30am

Another bill designed to make taxpayer-funded research available raises old questions and familiar divides. Does it have a chance of generating a productive decision? Continue reading »


Editorial Crisis: you won't read all this

Source: Science to Grok Posted: Monday, February 18, 2013 - 6:34am

In many field beyond Science we could see a huge editorial crisis. A comprehensive study by the University of Bristol and the journalism school of Cardiff University shows that Politics, Economy,...


Going solo or joining someone else’s show: multi-author blogs as a way to maximise your time and exposure

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Monday, February 18, 2013 - 3:00am

With the practice of academic blogging becoming increasingly mainstream, it is important to emphasise the diversity of blog formats out there, from personal blogs to multi-author blogs run by...


Validation vs. Filtration and Designation — Are We Mismarketing the Core Strengths of Peer Review?

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Monday, February 18, 2013 - 1:30am

Narrowing the definition of peer review to only validation standards, we may be exposing peer review in its least flattering light, while ignoring the more reliable and powerful ways in which peer...


Introduction to the Neuroscience Gateway Workshop

Source: NIF Blog FORCE11 Posted: Sunday, February 17, 2013 - 9:21pm

Introduction to the Neuroscience Gateway Workshop When: 10:00 – 12:00 PDT, 14 Mar, 2013 This workshop introduces participants to the Neuroscience Gateway (NSG), which is being developed for...


Book Review: Indigenous Research Methodologies

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Sunday, February 17, 2013 - 3:00am

Responding to increased emphasis in the classroom and the field on exposing students to diverse epistemologies, methods, and methodologies, Bagele Chilisa’s Indigenous Research Methodologies aims to...


80 patient groups (eighty!) sign up to alltrials.net in one go! Then Cancer Research UK!

Source: Bad Science Posted: Friday, February 15, 2013 - 7:02am

We rely on clinical trials in medicine, but companies and researchers are able to withhold results wherever it suits them: this breaks evidence based medicine. The best available systematic review...


The Simple Guide to Academic Podcasting: Know Your Audience and Your Schedule

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Friday, February 15, 2013 - 3:00am

Podcasts are rapidly becoming a regular feature of online research dissemination and university brand-building, so why do only a minority of academics use them to share their research? In the first...


Privatizing Peer Review — A Short Survey

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Friday, February 15, 2013 - 1:30am

Initiatives like Rubriq will succeed if it addresses the real needs of authors, reviewers, and editors. Take the survey and tell us what you think. Continue reading »


Animal Heartbreakers? Animals, Behavior, and “Love”

Source: Plos One Community Blog Posted: Thursday, February 14, 2013 - 3:20pm

Animal emotion remains a fairly contentious area of scientific research, but there is a growing body of evidence to support the idea that nonhuman animals can have feelings. The scientific community...


Amazon's margins

Source: DSHR's Blog Posted: Thursday, February 14, 2013 - 9:00am

I've been blogging a lot about the economics of cloud storage, and always using Amazon as the comparison. I've been stressing that the margins on their cloud storage business are extortionate. But...


The research impact agenda must translate measurement into learning

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Thursday, February 14, 2013 - 3:00am

Funders and the wider research community must avoid the temptation to reduce impact to just things that can be measured, says Liz Allen of the Wellcome Trust. Measurement should not be for measuring...


Extension and Conflation — How the NLM’s Confusing Brands Have Us All Mixed Up

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Thursday, February 14, 2013 - 1:30am

The National Library of Medicine has a couple of powerful brands, but they've become conflated and compromised by poor brand management. Ultimately, their brand value is derived from the value of the...


Open Science versus Ash Dieback (and the Tweenome revisited)

Source: GigaBlog Posted: Wednesday, February 13, 2013 - 8:53am

Bye Bye Bluebells Bluebell woods, the dense carpets of violet–blue flowers found in ancient woodland are a spectacular and famous springtime sight in Britain, but this picture postcard scene is...


Making Science Public as a route to better evidence

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Wednesday, February 13, 2013 - 3:00am

It is widely accepted that scientific evidence should play a role in policy decisions, yet the form that this should or could take remains subject to intense debate. Warren Pearce and Sujatha Raman ...


What Scholarly Publishers Can Learn from Bookish

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Wednesday, February 13, 2013 - 1:30am

Bookish is a new online bookstore and discovery service. It is a joint venture of three publishers and presents a useful model for what scholarly publishers could do in building their own online...


Follow the links…

Source: Think Links Posted: Tuesday, February 12, 2013 - 11:55pm

I’ve been reviewing papers lately and I’m beginning to develop a new heuristic: If I follow a link mentioned in the paper and there’s something there that’s reasonable, there...


NIF Webinar: Feb 19th 11 am PDT: Sage Bionetworks discusses ClearScience

Source: NIF Blog FORCE11 Posted: Tuesday, February 12, 2013 - 11:41am

Please join us to discuss the future of scientific communication as seen by SAGE Bionetworks. Title: clearScience: Dragging Scientific Communication into the Information Age Presenter: Erich Huang...


Rothenberg still wrong

Source: DSHR's Blog Posted: Tuesday, February 12, 2013 - 9:00am

Last March Jeff Rothenberg gave a keynote entitled Digital Preservation in Perspective:How far have we come, and what's next? to the Future Perfect 2012 conference at the wonderful, must-visit Te...


Participant confidentiality and open access to research data

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Tuesday, February 12, 2013 - 3:00am

While protecting human subjects’ confidentiality is a long-standing practice in the social sciences, new types of digital datasets present new challenges. Tensions between privacy and openness...


Don’t Shoot the Messenger — Keeping Our Eye on the Real Meaning of the eLife-PubMed Central Scandal

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Tuesday, February 12, 2013 - 1:30am

Attacks -- both overt and covert -- from OA advocates and NIH/NLM phantoms come in the wake of the posts revealing how eLife and PubMed Central coordinated activities and kept secrets. Continue...