Force11 Blogs


Licensing Controversy — Balancing Author Rights with Societal Good

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Tuesday, February 12, 2013 - 1:30am

The CC-BY license is assumed to be an open access standard, but the situation is complex -- for funders, authors, universities, and publishers of all types. Perhaps a less dogmatic approach would...


Spreading seeds: Animals assist forest fruits

Source: Plos One Community Blog Posted: Monday, February 11, 2013 - 12:58pm

Dwindling numbers of a single mammal species involved in seed dispersal could change the nature of Brazilian Atlantic forests in far-reaching ways. A recent study in PLOS ONE examined the role of...


5 Minutes with Professor Rachel Pain: “Research capacity is our greatest resource, and collaboration at any level has the potential to make for excellent research”

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Monday, February 11, 2013 - 3:00am

Rachel Pain talks with Mark Carrigan to discuss the impact agenda, collaborative research, and the distinct opportunities and challenges posed to the academic community by the Research Excellence...


When Sellers and Buyers Disagree — Edwin Mellen Press vs. a Critical Librarian

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Monday, February 11, 2013 - 1:30am

A librarian writes a blog post critical of a publisher. Publisher sues librarian and his current institution. It's a case that bears watching in this age of heightened communication combined with...


SSP Launches Sharp, Redesigned Web Site

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Monday, February 11, 2013 - 1:30am

The Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP) launches its new Web site -- a sharp, usable, and useful update that makes it easier to take advantage of SSP resources. Continue reading »


Book Review: Meme Wars: The Creative Destruction of Neoclassical Economics

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Sunday, February 10, 2013 - 3:00am

Over the last twenty years, Adbusters magazine has aimed to challenge consumerism, champion the environment, and provide a platform for some of our greatest thinkers. In 2011, they instigated Occupy...


Run parallel simulations via the Neuroscience Gateway!

Source: NIF Blog FORCE11 Posted: Friday, February 8, 2013 - 9:55pm

Computational neuroscientists are invited to use the Neuroscience Gateway portal http://www.nsgportal.org (NSG) to run parallel simulations on high performance computing (HPC) resources.  We are...


Impact factors, research assessment and an alternative to REF 2014

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Friday, February 8, 2013 - 3:00am

There is growing concern that the contentious journal impact factor is being used by universities as a proxy measure for research assessment. In light of this and the wider REF2014 exercise, Dorothy...


Yesterday’s Outage in the Kitchen

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Friday, February 8, 2013 - 1:30am

Zap -- unexpected site maintenance knocked us our for a few hours. No worries -- it was just an upgrade that took longer than we thought it would. Continue reading »


Pulling the Wool Over Their Eyes — The PubMed National Advisory Committee and Conflicts of Interest

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Friday, February 8, 2013 - 1:30am

Conflicts of interest at PubMed Central have been mismanaged, and seem to have led to loading the National Advisory Committee with Wellcome representatives, among other things. Continue reading...


Endorse and be endorsed to highlight research skills

Source: Research Gate Posted: Thursday, February 7, 2013 - 10:07am

Proving that you’re an expert at something can be difficult, just as it’s tricky to find a pro for a specialized task. ResearchGate made both easier with a new feature, Endorsements. Find...


Introducing Citations on ResearchGate

Source: Research Gate Posted: Thursday, February 7, 2013 - 10:08am

Add, manage, and curate your citations We know how important citations are to your research, and how difficult it is to find out exactly where you've been cited. With this in mind, our latest...


NIF Webinar: NIF 5.0 New Features for the user and developer

Source: NIF Blog FORCE11 Posted: Thursday, February 7, 2013 - 10:27am

The next NIF webinar will highlight the features of NIF 5.0, the new light-weight interface, that allows users to visually subset and customize data. We will focus on user features in the beginning...


We don’t all have to agree on what public engagement means in order to get involved

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Thursday, February 7, 2013 - 3:00am

When it comes to public engagement, many advocate for ‘shared definitions and frameworks’. Nick Mahony explores what the obstacles are to achieving this in practice and why the debates...


Why Were PubMed Central and eLife Discussing PeerJ?

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Thursday, February 7, 2013 - 1:30am

When PubMed Central expedited eLife, PeerJ wondered why. Emails within PMC suggest they were tempted to help PeerJ in the same way. They even talked with eLife about how to handle things. Continue...


Walk like a Camel (or a Giraffe)

Source: Plos One Community Blog Posted: Wednesday, February 6, 2013 - 3:31pm

It can be overwhelming to think of  the immense array of special shoes, insoles and orthotics available to relieve any manner of symptoms related to joint impact or stress. We have an entire...


Alt-metrics, Digital Opportunity and Africa

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Wednesday, February 6, 2013 - 3:00am

Altmetrics are real-time measures of the reach of an individual research output through a quantified look at downloads, shares, views, etc. But how legitimately can impact be measured given global...


Something’s Rotten in Bethesda, Indeed — How PubMed Central Came to Help Launch and Initially Publish eLife

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Wednesday, February 6, 2013 - 1:30am

Circumstantial evidence has become direct evidence -- that eLife requested publication in PMC; that PMC collaborated with eLife; that PMC sought to conceal its preferential treatment; and that...


This is excellent, and amazing. GSK have just signed up to alltrials.net

Source: Bad Science Posted: Tuesday, February 5, 2013 - 6:58am

GSK have just this minute announced that they are signing up to the alltrials.net campaign. This will be written in a hurry. Briefly: the results of clinical trials have been routinely withheld from...


Scholarly publishing: why not co-operatives?

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Tuesday, February 5, 2013 - 3:00am

The widespread perception that publishers are ripping off their customers must be addressed. Anthony Haynes argues that, rather than an open access model, a co-operative publishing model would be a...


A Taxonomy of Confusions

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Tuesday, February 5, 2013 - 1:30am

There are specific contributing factors to confusion and coherence. Understanding these, as well as your own strengths and weaknesses, can help you write, read, and edit better. Continue reading...


An Interview With Keith Collier, Co-Founder of Rubriq

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Tuesday, February 5, 2013 - 1:30am

With the creation of Rubriq, co-founders Shashi Mudunuri and Keith Collier have broken new ground. Rubriq is an attempt to provide peer-review independent from journals. Continue reading »


Antarctic bacteria float through winter

Source: Plos One Community Blog Posted: Monday, February 4, 2013 - 9:54am

As the Northern Hemisphere shivers through winter, bacteria in Antarctica are employing an inventive strategy to survive the extreme cold: they use a specialized antifreeze protein to latch onto the...


EU lead on clinical trials comes out in favour of transparency. Hurrah!

Source: Bad Science Posted: Monday, February 4, 2013 - 7:44am

There is a new EU Clinical Trials Regulation currently passing through parliament in Brussels. It is currently in draft form, and riddled with holes: essentially it allows companies and researchers...


By opening up a distinctive space between academic research and journalism, a thriving academic blogosphere mediates between them

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Monday, February 4, 2013 - 3:00am

Mark Carrigan finds that academic blogging holds out the possibility of extending the role of the academic, rather than threatening its diminution. It allows for discoverability, less specialised...