Force11 Blogs


Process behind a Nature Comment

Source: Research Remix Posted: Friday, January 11, 2013 - 8:55am

Publishing a Comment in Nature involved a process unlike any I’ve experienced to date, so I figured I’d document it (Comment itself is here).   I wish more people would document the story...


Beyond the PDF – Registration is now Open

Source: NIF Blog FORCE11 Posted: Friday, January 11, 2013 - 8:24am

Registration for the next Beyond the PDF conference is now open.  Participation in the conference is limited, so register early! About the conference: Scholarly communication across all disciplines...


The Other Academy Awards

Source: Dan Cohen's Blog Posted: Friday, January 11, 2013 - 8:03am

Two related problems have been bedeviling the current discussion of new modes of academic work. First, it remains unclear to many academics how we can effectively assess digital scholarship, given...


Podcasts and presentations now available from The Future of Academic Impacts conference

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Friday, January 11, 2013 - 3:00am

A conference by the London School of Economics Public Policy Group on Tuesday 4 December 2012 We’d like to say a huge thank you to all the attendees, speakers, and organisational staff who helped...


Environmental Lead and Crime — A Story of How Science Needs Storytellers

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Friday, January 11, 2013 - 1:30am

I forget exactly when I first came across the idea that environmental lead, leftover from decades of leaded gasoline, was a factor in mental acuity, violent tendencies, and potentially crime. It must...


First draft of just-published Value all Research Products

Source: Research Remix Posted: Thursday, January 10, 2013 - 9:00am

The copyright transfer agreement (arg) I signed for the just-published Comment in Nature included restrictions on where I may post a copy of the article: Although ownership of all Rights in the...


Just published: Value all research products

Source: Research Remix Posted: Thursday, January 10, 2013 - 8:05am

A Nature editor contacted me in November, asking if I’d like to write a Comment about the upcoming NSF policy change in Biosketch instructions.  It sounded like a great chance to talk...


Six Mistakes the Library Staff Are Making

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Thursday, January 10, 2013 - 1:30am

In a follow-up to the six mistakes sales reps make, here's a list of six mistakes library staff can make. It's a sobering comparison. Continue reading »


Announcing the World Register of Marine Species Collection

Source: Plos One Community Blog Posted: Wednesday, January 9, 2013 - 3:13pm

  The ocean teems with millions of plants, animals and other organisms, and keeping track of this vast inventory can be quite a laborious task. Since its launch in 2008 as an affiliated project...


Can journalism count as an academic research output?

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Wednesday, January 9, 2013 - 3:00am

Charlie Beckett argues that if we are to understand the potential value of any piece of research we should not circumscribe its audience by academic gate keeping. Ideally the academic will be the...


The Historians Are Revolting — Leading History Journal Editors Take on the Research Councils UK

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Wednesday, January 9, 2013 - 1:30am

A group of history editors in the UK publish an open letter stating they will not comply with aspects of the RCUK mandates for OA. What can we learn from this? Continue reading »


A post-it note summary of web science

Source: Think Links Posted: Tuesday, January 8, 2013 - 4:00am

Below is a post-it note summary made with our students in the Web Science course. This is the capstone class for students doing the Web Science minor here a the VU and the summary highlights the...


Have Journal Prices Really Increased Much in the Digital Age?

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Tuesday, January 8, 2013 - 1:30am

A new report on institutional information expenditures raises the real possibility that instead of their being a pricing problem, there's a quantity problem driving expenditures. Continue reading...


Adrien Treuille on collaborative science

Source: Science to Grok Posted: Monday, January 7, 2013 - 1:32pm

Solve for X is a forum to encourage and amplify technology based moonshot thinking and teamwork. http://www.wesolveforx.com G+:http://goo.gl/T3qQoWe will talk thoroughly on Solve for X in...


Thanking Our Peer Reviewers

Source: Plos One Community Blog Posted: Monday, January 7, 2013 - 10:58am

What a year it has been! As 2013 commences we would like to take a moment to recognize the peer reviewers that made the previous year possible. In 2012 over 60,000 people reviewed for PLOS ONE, up...


How Much Of The Web Is Archived?

Source: DSHR's Blog Posted: Monday, January 7, 2013 - 9:00am

MIT's Technology Review has a nice article about Scott Ainsworth et al's important paper How Much Of The Web Is Archived? (readable summary here). The paper reports an important initial step in...


Intellectual Property Is a University’s Best Friend

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Monday, January 7, 2013 - 1:30am

Universities should seek to retain control of their copyrights and develop mechanisms to monetize them to ensure the financial health of the institutions. This is a proposal that sides neither with...


I made this Radio 4 documentary on randomised trials on government policy

Source: Bad Science Posted: Sunday, January 6, 2013 - 12:38pm

Here’s a documentary I made for BBC Radio 4 (with producer Rami Tzabar) about evidence based social policy, and why we should do more randomised trials in government. It’s good fun, 40...


So you want to have a PhD? Tell more how do you swallow this spaghetti dish..

Source: Science to Grok Posted: Sunday, January 6, 2013 - 1:33am

Collection of data is becoming everyday embarrassingly cheaper. The main problem so far is the storage, the organization and last but not least the harsh process of analyzing large data sets. The...


Go Library of Congress!

Source: DSHR's Blog Posted: Friday, January 4, 2013 - 12:00pm

Carl Franzen at talkingpointsmemo.com pointed me to the report from the Library of Congress on the state of their ingest of the Twitter-stream. Congratulations to the team for two major achievements:...


Open citations developments

Source: Open Citations and Semantic Publishing Posted: Friday, January 4, 2013 - 8:06am

Following the decision to merge the planned development of the Open Citations Corpus with the Related Work Project, described in the previous blog post, we proposed to develop one underlying data...


Why openness benefits research

Source: Open Citations and Semantic Publishing Posted: Friday, January 4, 2013 - 7:52am

David writes: Dr Heinrich Hartman is a new colleague of mine, who, having been working in the Mathematical Institute of Oxford University, has just returned to Germany to start a new job in a leading...


Open Citations and Related Work projects merge

Source: Open Citations and Semantic Publishing Posted: Friday, January 4, 2013 - 7:55am

What is Related Work? Related Work is a user-friendly Web application developed to provide a means of browsing citation links, as the basis for a planned recommendation service for the best articles...


OA and the UK Humanities & Social Sciences: Wrong risks and missed opportunities

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Friday, January 4, 2013 - 3:00am

Humanities and Social Sciences are facing oblivion unless researchers take this generational opportunity to reset the thinking and funding mechanisms. Cameron Neylon writes that it is time humanities...


Pickpockets, Attention, and Neuroscience — A Demonstration

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Friday, January 4, 2013 - 1:30am

Can you pay attention? Or will your attention deficits make you pay? This pickpocket knows the answer, and he's helping people understand why their attention wanders, falters, or . . . squirrel!...