Force11 Blogs


Disrupt science: But not how you’d think

Source: Victoria Stodden Posted: Tuesday, November 8, 2011 - 10:29am

Two recent articles call for an openness revolution in science: one on GigaOM and the other in the Wall Street Journal. But they’ve got it all wrong. These folks are missing that the process of...


Don’t expect computer scientists to be on top of every use that’s found for computers, including scientific investigation

Source: Victoria Stodden Posted: Tuesday, November 8, 2011 - 8:12am

Computational scientists need to understand and assert their computational needs, and see that they are met. I just read this excellent interview with Donald Knuth, inventor of TeX and the concept of...


A Great Year for Collaborative Revolutions

Source: Elsevier Labs Posted: Friday, November 4, 2011 - 1:46pm

As we are nearing its end, it seems fair to say that 2011 was a great year for peaceful revolutions. First of all, the many pivotal transformations in North Africa excited and spurred watershed...


“Bad Science” is £2.49 on Kindle for the next week

Source: Bad Science Posted: Friday, November 4, 2011 - 9:04am

Briefly: I thought this was a pricing error, but it turns out it’s deliberate, so… My book is £2.49 on Kindle for the next week or so. When it’s this cheap you might as well use it...


Why won’t Professor Susan Greenfield publish this theory in a scientific journal?

Source: Bad Science Posted: Thursday, November 3, 2011 - 2:43pm

Ben Goldacre, The Guardian, Saturday 22 October 2011 This week Baroness Susan Greenfield, Professor of pharmacology at Oxford, apparently announced that computer games are causing dementia in...


A Gathering Storm of Scholarly Transformation

Source: E-research a Nature Network Blog Posted: Sunday, October 30, 2011 - 9:17am

I’ve decided I like being a “transformer”, which is how Harvard astronomer Alyssa Goodman addressed the participants at the Microsoft Research Transforming Scholarly Communication...


Great piece in .net magazine about nerdydaytrips.com

Source: Bad Science Posted: Friday, October 28, 2011 - 7:46am

Hi, just to say, there’s a great piece in this month’s .net magazine about www.nerdydaytrips.com, the crowd-sourced dorky-days-out Why-Don’t-You project I built with Applecado,...


New edition of “Testing Treatments”, best pop science book on Evidence Based Medicine ever.

Source: Bad Science Posted: Tuesday, October 18, 2011 - 5:19am

People often ask if there’s one good book that is accessible to all, about how evidence based medicine works. The answer is undoubtedly “Testing Treatments“. I name-check it to...


Publishing’s Perfect Storm…

Source: Elsevier Labs Posted: Friday, October 7, 2011 - 5:56am

There is a perfect storm forming in the publishing sector, and not the negative one of impending doom and gloom that typically comes to mind. This new storm, created by a tsunami of data and flood of...


Segmentation of neuronal structures in EM stacks challenge – ISBI 2012

Source: NIF Blog FORCE11 Posted: Thursday, October 6, 2011 - 1:27pm

In this challenge, a full stack of EM slices will be used to train machine learning algorithms for the purpose of automatic segmentation of neural structures. Anybody can participate in the...


What if academics were as dumb as quacks with statistics?

Source: Bad Science Posted: Monday, October 3, 2011 - 5:31am

Ben Goldacre, The Guardian, Saturday 10th September 2011 We all like to laugh at quacks when they misuse basic statistics. But what if academics, en masse, deploy errors that are equally foolish?...


You might also enjoy my second blog…

Source: Bad Science Posted: Thursday, September 29, 2011 - 7:44am

As well as being here I’m also there: here’s a quick round-up of recent posts from my other blog where I post scatty, brief scribbles in between bouts of real work, they’re in the...


Cherry picking is bad. At least warn us when you do it.

Source: Bad Science Posted: Thursday, September 29, 2011 - 3:27am

Ben Goldacre, The Guardian, Saturday 24 September 2011 Last week the Daily Mail and the Today programme took some bait from Aric Sigman, an author of popular sciencey books about the merits of...


Topics - add attachments to your comments

Source: Research Gate Posted: Monday, September 26, 2011 - 3:42am

We bring you another topics update - you can now attach publications, links, images or files to your comments. Just write your reply and add the appropriate media to support your comment...


Benford’s Law: using stats to bust an entire nation for naughtiness.

Source: Bad Science Posted: Friday, September 23, 2011 - 2:49am

Ben Goldacre, The Guardian, Saturday 17 September 2011 This week we might bust an entire nation for handing over dodgy economic statistics. But first: why would they bother? Well, it turns out that...


Update: Browse topics by discipline

Source: Research Gate Posted: Wednesday, September 21, 2011 - 3:56am

You can now browse by discipline to find the topics that interest you - just click on ‘Browse topics by discipline’ on your topics overview page. If you’re looking for something...


ResearchGate’s Bastian Hofmann to share his knowledge of OpenSocial at web DevCon and PHP Conference 2011

Source: Research Gate Posted: Saturday, September 17, 2011 - 10:32am

Bastian Hofmann, one of ResearchGate’s very own software engineers, will be sharing his technical know-how at two upcoming developer conferences: PHP Conference 2011 - at Rheingoldhalle -...


Academic papers are hidden from the public. Here’s some direct action.

Source: Bad Science Posted: Friday, September 16, 2011 - 6:22am

Ben Goldacre, The Guardian, Saturday 3 September 2011 This week George Monbiot won the internet with a long Guardian piece on academic publishers. For those who didn’t know: academics, funded mostly...


Update: Contributing to topics

Source: Research Gate Posted: Thursday, September 1, 2011 - 2:47am

We’ve made it a whole lot easier to contribute to topics. You can now post directly to any topic you’re following from your topics overview page. So the next time you want to ask a question...


Brain imaging studies report more positive findings than their numbers can support. This is fishy.

Source: Bad Science Posted: Friday, August 26, 2011 - 6:14am

Ben Goldacre, The Guardian, Saturday 13 August 2011 While the authorities are distracted by mass disorder, we can do some statistics. You’ll have seen plenty of news stories telling you that one part...


Follow discussions within a topic

Source: Research Gate Posted: Thursday, August 25, 2011 - 5:32am

As part of our effort to continue improving Topics, we’ve now made it possible for you to follow specific discussions. As well as having the option to follow an entire topic, you can now...


Sampling error, the unspoken issue behind small number changes in the news

Source: Bad Science Posted: Monday, August 22, 2011 - 4:51am

Ben Goldacre, The Guardian, Saturday 20 August 2011 What do all these numbers mean? “‘Worrying’ jobless rise needs urgent action – Labour” was the BBC headline. They...


Topics Update

Source: Research Gate Posted: Thursday, August 18, 2011 - 1:32am

We’ve made some changes to Topics based on your feedback. You can now search through a topic to find the discussions you’re looking for. Just enter your keywords into the search bar to the right...


I made a documentary about cohort studies in epidemiology, on BBC Radio 4

Source: Bad Science Posted: Thursday, August 4, 2011 - 11:10am

I made a documentary about prospective cohort studies in epidemiology, they’re the tool we use to find out if one thing is associated with another, where trials are impossible. It’s...


The Science Organism

Source: E-research a Nature Network Blog Posted: Saturday, July 30, 2011 - 9:00am

What happens when there are millions and millions of executable papers, sitting there and executing away…? Our aforementioned “Executable journals” are a step towards this vision...