Force11 Blogs


Beyond mandates: For open science to become a norm, it must be recognised and rewarded

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Tuesday, December 1, 2020 - 4:00am

Calls to align incentives in academia to promote open research practices are not new. However, in recent years research funders are increasingly implementing policies and schemes designed to promote...


SSP’s Early Career Development Podcast: Episode 6, SSP’s Fellowship and Mentorship Programs and the New Generations Fund

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Tuesday, December 1, 2020 - 3:00am

Meredith Adinolfi and Sara Grimme speak with Vicky Truter, Adya Misra, and Sai Konda about their experiences and participation in SSP’s Fellowship and Mentorship programs. The post SSP’s Early...


The SSP Generations Fund: Investing in the Promise of our Future

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Tuesday, December 1, 2020 - 2:30am

The Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP) is investing in future generations of scholarly communications professionals and championing the values of inclusion, diversity, and equity. Find out how...


Contest: The Internet Archive is Looking For Creative Short Films Made By You!

Source: Internet Archive Blogs Posted: Monday, November 30, 2020 - 6:14pm

We are looking for artists of all levels to create and upload a short film of 2-3 minutes to the Internet Archive to help us celebrate Public Domain Day on December 17th! Public Domain Day is...


COVID-19: Where is the data?

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Monday, November 30, 2020 - 4:00am

The arrival of the COVID-19 pandemic has led many to argue that scholarly communication and publishing is undergoing a revolution, in terms of not only the wider opening of access to research, but...


Don’t Miss Your Chance to Participate in the SSP 2021 Annual Meeting!

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Monday, November 30, 2020 - 2:30am

Send in your proposals for sessions at the 2021 SSP Annual Meeting. The post Don’t Miss Your Chance to Participate in the SSP 2021 Annual Meeting! appeared first on The Scholarly Kitchen.


Author Interview: Q and A with Dr Phillipa K. Chong on Inside the Critics’ Circle: Book Reviewing in Uncertain Times

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Sunday, November 29, 2020 - 12:00am

In this author interview, we speak to Dr Phillipa K. Chong about her recent book, Inside the Critics’ Circle: Book Reviewing in Uncertain Times, which takes readers behind the scenes of fiction...


Growing together– celebrating tropical agriculture research in PLOS ONE

Source: Plos One Community Blog Posted: Friday, November 27, 2020 - 3:29am

Agricultural production sustains human life across the globe, but nowhere does it face a more complex combination of socioeconomic and environmental constraints- or play a more central role in...


Building new bridges between research and policy during a national lockdown

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Friday, November 27, 2020 - 12:00am

Annette Boaz and Kathryn Oliver are social scientists with expertise in production and use of evidence for, policy. In this blogpost, they reflect on their recent experiences putting their knowledge...


For COVID-19 vaccination programmes to be effective history shows gender equality in science is necessary

Source: Impact of Social Sciences Posted: Thursday, November 26, 2020 - 3:01am

Drawing on the history of public health and anti-vaccination movements in 19th and 20th century Britain, Susan McPherson outlines how the sidelining of academics along gender lines during the COVID-...


Exploring the cracks in our knowledge systems

Source: The International Network for the Availability of Scientific Publications Posted: Thursday, November 26, 2020 - 2:00am

The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted and emphasised many of the inequities in our current knowledge systems, but it has also provided an opportunity to reflect on what could be improved, as Maha...


Thanks A Lot — A Quarantined Thanksgiving

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Thursday, November 26, 2020 - 2:30am

A Thanksgiving song for a year that has left us broken-hearted. The post Thanks A Lot — A Quarantined Thanksgiving appeared first on The Scholarly Kitchen.


Open science and cognitive psychology: An interview with Guest Editor Nivedita Mani and Mariella Paul

Source: Plos One Community Blog Posted: Wednesday, November 25, 2020 - 9:41am

Nivi is Professor at University of Göttingen, Germany where she is leads the “Psychology of Language” research group at the Georg-Elias-Müller Institute for Psychology. Her work examines...


Chef’s Selections: Best Books Read (and more!) During 2020, Part 2

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Wednesday, November 25, 2020 - 2:30am

The beginning of the holiday season means it’s time for our annual list of our favorite books read during the year (and more!) . Part 2. The post Chef’s Selections: Best Books Read (and more!)...


I Rest My Case

Source: DSHR's Blog Posted: Tuesday, November 24, 2020 - 8:00am

Jeff Rothenberg's seminal 1995 Ensuring the Longevity of Digital Documents focused on the threat of the format in which the documents were encoded becoming obsolete, and rendering its content...


Two Online Synchronous Events: Wed 25 and Thurs 26 November 2020: On Comics, Dementia and Narrative Design, and Un sur epistemológico para las Humanidades Digitales

Source: Ernesto Priego's blog Posted: Tuesday, November 24, 2020 - 2:09am

Where I share an invitation to two online events where I will participate this week.


Chef’s Selections: Best Books Read (and more!) During 2020, Part 1

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Tuesday, November 24, 2020 - 2:30am

The beginning of the holiday season means it’s time for our annual list of our favorite books read during the year (and more!). Part 1 today, Part 2 tomorrow. The post Chef’s Selections: Best...


How do you facilitate an online meeting or course? Our new tutorial can help

Source: The International Network for the Availability of Scientific Publications Posted: Tuesday, November 24, 2020 - 1:53am

As travel and face-to-face meetings continue to be restricted, we introduce a new self-paced online tutorial designed to help with facilitation of online courses and events.


When We Look Back on 2020, What Will We See?

Source: Dan Cohen's Blog Posted: Monday, November 23, 2020 - 2:29pm

It is far too early to understand what happened in this historic year of 2020, but not too soon to grasp what we will write that history from: data—really big data, gathered from our devices and...


Introducing the Open Soft Robotics Research Collection

Source: Plos One Community Blog Posted: Monday, November 23, 2020 - 3:20am

PLOS ONE is delighted to announce a Collection entitled Open Soft Robotics Research. This Collection consists of research articles submitted to a 2019-2020 Call for Papers on the same topic. As the...


A World Elsewhere: PLOS’s Community Action Publishing Model

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Monday, November 23, 2020 - 2:30am

Can community-action publishing prove to be a viable alternative to market-based publishing? The post A World Elsewhere: PLOS’s Community Action Publishing Model appeared first on The Scholarly...


FOSS wins again: Free and Open Source Communities comes through on 19th Century Newspapers (and Books and Periodicals…)

Source: Internet Archive Blogs Posted: Sunday, November 22, 2020 - 10:00pm

I have never been more encouraged and thankful to Free and Open Source communities. Three months ago I posted a request for help with OCR’ing and processing 19th Century Newspapers and we got...


Flash Back! Further Thoughts on Flash at the Internet Archive

Source: Internet Archive Blogs Posted: Saturday, November 21, 2020 - 8:37pm

A little behind the scenes here at the Archive: this blog is the province of a wide range of sub-groups, from books and partnerships over to development and collaborators. There’s usually a...


Un no-poema pandémico

Source: Ernesto Priego's blog Posted: Saturday, November 21, 2020 - 2:06am

No-poesía diaria via Whatsapp.


Size Matters, or, Why Don’t We Have Gigantic Bacteria?

Source: The Scholarly Kitchen Posted: Friday, November 20, 2020 - 2:30am

Why aren't we overrun with gigantic bacteria? It's a matter of diffusion. The post Size Matters, or, Why Don’t We Have Gigantic Bacteria? appeared first on The Scholarly Kitchen.