Scholarly Ontologies Project (ScolOnto)

The ScholOnto Project is a 3 year effort (2001-2004) to build and deploy a prototype infrastructure for making scholarly claims about the significance of research documents. 'Claims' are made by making connections between ideas. Any claim is of course open to counterarguments. The connections are grounded in a discourse/argumentation ontology which makes possible innovative services for navigating visualizing and analyzing the network as it grows. Over the project's 3 years we have evolved a suite of prototype tools for modelling conceptual networks of ideas and arguments publishing them for reuse and argumentation and navigating searching and filtering this repository as it grows. Some of these are now freely available to play with but WARNING! we are no longer able to support them so are not able to assist if you have problems or lose data WARNING!.The system we have built is called ClaiMaker: an initial release will be available for early adopters to try in Autumn 2002. Others include ClaimSpotter ClaiMapper ClaimFinder ClaimBlogger and ClaiMaker Microsoft Word plug-in. Additionally the ScholOnto RDF Schema is available http://projects.kmi.open.ac.uk/scholonto/resources/Scholonto2.rdfsUser Communities: We envisage such a tool as having potential not only in scholarly publishing but for corporate knowledge analysis (Do we we know what we know? ...or what we disagree on?) and in education (What is the status of this debate? What are the main camps in this field? What are the key concepts in this course?).Complementary work: ScholOnto's focus on net-centric representations of research is complemented by work on augmenting more conventional textual documents with threaded commentary and debate. An open source web publishing tool is available called D3E (Digital Document Discourse Environment). Many applications are illustrated on the site including the award-winning Journal of Interactive Media in Education.

Resource Type: 
Parent organization: 
Open University; Milton Keynes; United Kingdom
Supporting agency: 
EPSRC
Grant: 
01
PMID: