Processes

Related Content
NIKE AIR MAX 90
Acheter air max france
Nike Air Max Pas Cher
Trusty URIs: Verifiable, Immutable, and Permanent Digital Artifacts for Linked Data
JournalGuide
ResExomeDB
My Talk @ Beyond the PDF 1
EnablingOpenScholarship
iSpyBio
Wireless & Mobile Technology: The future of content communication
Four Postulates for Diagrams as Semantic Data Carriers in Scientific Publications
conTEXT: Exploiting Linked Data for Content Analysis
ResearchCompendia
DFG-Project: Future Publications in the Humanities (Fu-PusH)
10 Simple Rules for the Care and Feeding of Scientific Data
Resource Identification Initiative
Meeting on "Publish or perish? The future of scholarly publishing and careers"
Can Scholarly Publishing Evolve Beyond the PDF?
Open access and research communication: the perspective of FORCE11
Creative Commons for Science: Interview with Puneet Kishor
Sayeed Choudhury reflects on the research data revolution
Utilising organic search (SEO) for wider content exposure
SobekCM Digital Repository Software
BioFormats
OMERO - Open Microscopy Environment Remote Objects
OME-TIFF; Open Microscopy Environment Tagged Image File Format
JCB DataViewer
SEEK
RightField
Synapse
Europe PubMed Central
Epistemio
ESIP Data Management Training for Scientists
ENDORSE the Joint Declaration of Data Citation Principles
WorkingWiki
DMPTool
figshare
EZID
How a little bit of technology can fix the editing and production processes for the social sciences.
PAV ontology: Provenance, Authoring and Versioning
Web Annotation as a First Class Object
Open DOAR
Wikifying scholarly canons
CiteAb: The Antibody Search Engine
Git2Prov
ShareLaTeX
What will future publications be like?
GROTOAP: Ground Truth for Open Access Publications
Resource Identification and Tracking in the Neuroscience Literature (Draft)
Open Access Week
Disembargo: An Open Access Dissertation, One Letter at a Time
PubMed Commons: Post publication peer review goes mainstream
Biotea: RDFizing PubMed Central in support for the paper as an interface to the Web of Data
IBM Announcing the IMPROVER Network Verification Challenge
U-Compare
Adobe Forms Central
Webmaker
Etherpad
Mendeley
Evernote
Memento
Knowledge Blog
NaCTeM - National Center for Text Mining
ckan - The open source data portal software
CBOX (Commons in a Box)
Scholarly Open Access
DOAJ - Director of Open Access Journals
ROARMAP: Registry of Open Access Repositories Mandatory Archiving Policies
Cohere
Open Provenance Model Vocabulary
JISC Open Citations
Rubriq
Academia.edu
GREC Corpus
GENIA Project: Mining literature for knowledge in molecular biology
BioCreative
ROAR
UK PubMed Central
PubMed
Flipboard
ResearchGate
myExperiment
ISA Infrastructure for Managing Experimental Metadata
AcroMine
VisTrails
Data management “Starting at Ground-Zero” event OHSU in Portland, OR
Reporting research antibody use: how to increase experimental reproducibility
BRDI Announces Data and Information Challenge
Secretive and Subjective, Peer Review Proves Resistant to Study
The Ultimate Who-To-Follow Guide for Tweeting Librarians, Info Pros, and Educators
Changes in the Research Process Must Come From the Scientific Community, not Federal Regulation
Vivo hiring Director
Dude, Where’s My Data?
Stick to Your Ribs: Why Hasn’t Scientific Publishing Been Disrupted Already?
A Few Overarching Thoughts on Digital Publishing and How You Can Participate
The Era of Open
A Clean Slate? Keynote by Herbert Van de Sompel delivered at delivered at ELAG 2013

Currently the process of communicating scholarship can be considered to be disjoint. The interface between scholar, publisher, editor, reviewer, custodian, and consumer (as examples of stakeholders) is not seamless. This has become more pronounced as we have moved from an analog (print) to digital (on-line) mode of communicating scholarship. Components that were defined for an era of analog-only communication persist. The disjoint process impacts the speed of delivery, the quality of the product, and the availability of the scholarship.
Whether the cause or the effect, the underlying information systems supporting digital information are to blame. For example, how we maintain information in the laboratory is varied, ranging from disjoint Word documents, to Evernote to sophisticated laboratory management systems, none of which interface well with the publisher's journal management systems. The end result is to restrict what scholarship is available and how it is available.

Existing workflow systems are a step in the right direction as they better capture the process of research acting as both productivity tools and tools leading to better reproducibility and persistence of research. What would seem to be required is a soup to nuts set of interoperable components deal with process of communicating scholarship. As such they might be perceived as overlapping other target areas addressed by FORCE11 (Authoring, Markup, Containers and Reward Systems), but processes are really the glue that  holds them together.